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Dr. James M. Russell, III

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james.russell@hamptonu.edu Location: 23 Tyler Street
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Dr. James M. Russell, III

Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Co-Director

Dr. Russell’s research has focused on atmospheric science, remote sensing and satellite data analysis to study properties and processes in Earth’s atmosphere. He began his career in electrical engineering at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia developing instrumentation and performing ground and rocket reentry tests of heat shield material used on the Gemini and Apollo capsules. He also worked on instrumentation for characterizing the Martian atmosphere during entry.

Dr. Russell has served as Co-PI on the Nimbus-7 LIMS satellite experiment to study odd nitrogen effects on the ozone layer and PI for the HALOE experiment on the UARS satellite to study odd chlorine and odd nitrogen effects on ozone . He currently serves as PI for the SABER experiment on the TIMED satellite to study the chemistry, dynamics and energetics of the thermosphere and mesosphere and PI on the AIM mission to study noctilucent clouds.

Dr. Russell served as head of the Chemistry and Dynamics Branch and the Theoretical Studies Branch in the NASA Langley Atmospheric Sciences Division and currently is a Professor of Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences and Co-Director of the Center for Atmospheric Sciences at Hampton University in Virginia. He received the BSEE degree from Virginia Tech, the MSEE degree from the University of Virginia and the PhD in Aeronomy from the University of Michigan. He is author or co-author of more than 350 papers in the scientific literature.

Research Interests: Atmospheric Science, Remote Sensing, and Satellite Data Analysis

Curriculum Vitae (PDF File)

Publications:

  • Russell, III, James M., Scott M. Bailey, Mihaly Horanyi, Larry L. Gordley, David W. Rusch, Mark E. Hervig, Gary E. Thomas, Cora E. Randall, David E. Siskind, Michael H. Stevens, Michael E. Summers, Michael I. Taylor, Christoph R. Englert, Patrick J. Espy, William E. McClintock and Aimee W. Merkel, Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM): Overview and early science results, J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.08.011.
  • Gordley, L.L., Mark Hervig, Chad Fish, James M. Russell, III, James Cook, Scott Hanson, Andrew Shumway, Scott Bailey, Greg Paxton,Lance Deaver, Tom Marshall, John Burton, Brian Magill, Chris Brown, Earl Thompson, and John Kemp, The Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.012.
  • Yang, E.-S., D. M. Cunnold, R. J. Salawitch, M. P. McCormick, James M. Russell, III, J. M. Zawodny, S. Oltmans, and M. J. Newchurch, Attribution of recovery in lower-stratospheric ozone, Journal of Geophysical Research, 111, D16315, doi:10.1029/2005JD006371., 2006.
  • Mlynczak, Marty, F. Javier Martin-Torres, James M. Russell, III, Ken Beaumont, Steven Jacobson, Janet Kozyra, Manuel Lopez-Puertas, Bernd Funke, Christopher Mertens, Larry Gordley, Richard Picard, Jeremy Winick, Peter Wintersteiner, Larry Paxton, The natural thermostat of nitric oxide emission at 5.3 μm in the thermosphere observed during the solar storms of April 2002, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, No. 21, 2100, doi:10.1029/2003GL017693, 2003.
  • Russell, James M., III, Mingzhao Luo, Ralph J.Cicerone and Lance E. Deaver, Satellite confirmation of the dominance of chlorofluorocarbons in the global stratospheric chlorine budget, Nature, Vol. 379, Issue 6565, pp. 526-529, 1996.